Selected State Law Provisions

FLORIDA: A grandparent, adult aunt or uncle or person with power of attorney can consent to medical care or treatment of a minor after a treatment provider has failed in his or her reasonable attempt to contact a parent, legal custodian or legal guardian. Under this law, no writing is necessary to convey consent power.

LOUISIANA: Relatives who become either a child’s legal custodian or guardian and have an income less than 150% of the federal poverty guidelines are eligible to receive the monthly subsidy payments.

MISSOURI: Grandparents (or other relatives) who become either the child’s legal custodian or guardian and attend foster parent training are eligible to receive the monthly subsidy payments.

NORTH CAROLINA: An adult who is raising a child informally can enroll the child in a school district where the adult is a domiciliary provided an affidavit is submitted of the parent, legal guardian or legal custodian or the adult with whom the child lives. If the parent is unable, refuses or is unavailable to submit the affidavit, the adult’s affidavit should include a statement that the parent is unable, refuses or is unavailable.

PENNSYLVANIA: A parent, legal guardian or custodian may give an adult, including a relative caregiver, authorization to consent to medical or mental health care for the child. The authorization can be in any written form and must be signed by the parent, legal guardian or custodian and witnessed by two adults, neither of whom is the person to whom authorization is being given. There is no time limit on this authorization, but can be revoked at will. Furthermore, the death of the parent, legal guardian or custodian who executed the authorization will automatically revoke the authorization.


Inside Selected State Law Provisions